My articles about Azure

Create a real-life example (Function, Service Bus Queue, Storage Table) of an Azure Logic App. A step to step example.

Some time ago I wrote an article with an example of an Azure Function which I used in my applications. With the current article I want to present you another real-life example of using different Azure Services and combining them together in a Logic App.

A Logic App represents a workflow of steps that are defined to be done in a sequential or in a parallel manner.

Our scenario contains a company which owns an eshop. We are going to build a workflow for getting customer orders, pushing them into a queue for almost-real-time process (A queue is a good way to balance load of large number of requests in your servers), retrieving them back, storing them in a storage table and informing the user about her order with an email. The most important thing, we are going to develop all the steps inside the Azure Portal; the use of Visual Studio is optional.

After we finish with the creation of our Logic App, we are going to have the following workflow:

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The reason behind the identifier could not be resolved error in your CosmosDB queries

When writing SQL queries to test them against your CosmosDB collections, chances are that your deal with the following error message:

Identifier XXX could not be resolved.

where XXX is the name of a property inside your collection. You could have for example the following query:

SELECT * FROM students WHERE firstname = 'Christos'

The reason for the error is that you forgot something in your query.

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How to fix the 'Could not load file or assembly Newtonsoft.Json, Version=7.0.0.0...' error when creating a REST API Client for Azure in Visual Studio

The last few days I have been experimenting with the different types of App Services that the Azure platform provides. One very interesting combination of app services is a ASP.NET MVC client (Azure Web app) or a WebAPI (Azure API app) which acts as the middleware between a JavaScript client and an internal “business” WebAPI (Azure API app). The architecture looks like this:

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A real world Azure Function example that logs client errors in a Storage Table

Today I invested some time into getting deeper to the topic of Azure Functions. Together with the new microservices architecture, new ways of doing business logic arise. Azure Functions are small chunks of code that run in a “serverless” (you do not care about allocating new hardware resources, even when the requests to the function raise) environment and each of them is meant to do one specific job.

Apart from the great examples and templates with Functions that you can find inside the Azure Portal, I tried to think of some use cases that I would use an Azure Function for a web application and I came up with the following one:

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Store .NET objects inside an Azure Table Storage and then retrieve them back in their original type

Non-relational databases are becoming more and more popular as a solution for storing your data. Cloud solutions like Microsoft Azure also get more popular with every day.

Currently Azure supports two types of “NoSQL” databases in the Azure portal. The one is DocumentDB (the NoSQL option in the main menu of the portal) and the other is the Table Storage (from the Storage accounts option in main menu). Do not confuse this Table with the tables of a relational database, they are not the same! A detailed analysis of the differences and similarities of the two technologies is beyond the purpose of this article, but we can summarize them to the following points:

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The subscription is not registered for the resource type components in the location Central US error when creating a new Azure Web App in Visual Studio

With the Azure cloud solution from Microsoft we can create a new web application with Visual Studio, deploy it as a Azure Web App and “go live” in only few minutes.

I recently was faced with the “The subscription is not registered for the resource type ‘components’ in the location ‘Central US’” error when I was trying to publish my new web application to a Website (or a Web App) in Azure. Either starting from scratch with a web project and doing the mapping or by using the Publish option of an already created project, I was getting the same error. Visual Studio tried to publish the application to Windows Azure with no success.

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